ICCC-What I’ve learned so far

Well, some but not all of the Powerpoints are out, and there are a few videos-I’m still sifting through them, but here’s what I’ve gotten out of them so far:

The first presentation that peaked my interest was Syun Akasofu. He presented extensive evidence for his view that recent climate change is mainly a continuation of the recovery from the Little Ice Age and a multidecadal oscillation. When looking at data sets from around the world for variables besides just temperature, its clear that climate can change dramtically naturally.

J. Scott Armstrong and Kesten Green argued convincingly that, from the forecaster’s point of view, IPCC “projections” are not valid for basing policy decisionson. Alexandre Aguiar totally skewered the idea that AGW can be connected to extreme weather, with an emphasis on South America. Craig Idso debunked the idea that marine life is threatened by ocean acidification.

David Legates showed how environmentalist NGOs abused data and improperly applied statistical techniques to connect “extreme precipitation events” to AGW. Ross McKitrick talk about his idea of a “T3 tax” instead of Capn’ Trade, which would tie policy to warming in the Tropical Troposphere-which I really should discuss some time.

Craig Loehle talked about his paleoclimate work and evidence for climate change being mostly a part of a 1500 year cycle, and talked about the flaws in some paleoclimate studies, and the recent decrease in ocean heat content-inconsistent with AGW theories. Bill Kininmonth talked about climate sensitivity-and how he thinks that models get to high a value. His estimate just so happens to match my own!

Joe D’Aleo talked about issues with surface temperature data, and the role of the PDO, AMO, and solar variations in climate change. Pat Michaels totally destroyed the EPA’s Advance Notice for Proposed Rulemaking. Indur Goklany had such an interesting presentation that I’ll have to return to it later-it definitely deserves its own post! Stan Goldenberg debunked studies claiming AGW is linked to increasing tropical cyclones.

Richard Keen talked about is work on estimating volcanic aerosol affects, and showed how a considerable portion of the warming trend (since 1979) could be attributed to the clearing of the air after Pinatubo and El Chicon. James O’Brien talked about climate change in the South Eastern US, especially our shared home state-Florida! and how land use has affected the regional climate, and the overall trends are cooling.

Bob Ferguson illustrated the absurdity of States adopting their own climate policies, focusing on Arkansas. George Taylor talked about the role of the PDO in regional climate change. Roy Spencer talked about his feedback work and some evidence for the role of the PDO in causing global climate change.

Overall, fascinating stuff, and I learned alot. More details later.

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6 Comments

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6 responses to “ICCC-What I’ve learned so far

  1. Sirius the Star Dog

    Ever heard of the key?

    You know, paragraphs? Formatting?

    Run-on posts…like this one…blow chunks.

  2. timetochooseagain

    Ouch! Harsh man! Listen, I don’t always have time to do things perfectly. So, maybe, when I have time, I’ll go back and fix the formatting. And then I’m sure you can provide a criticism of the actually content. You can, right?

  3. Andrew, I thought you might have missed this, so I’m dropping you a link. Even some blind lib professors find an acorn every once in a while.

    http://www.newsmax.com/insidecover/berkeley_prof_bashes_gore/2009/03/16/192311.html

    I just read your “about” page. You’re 18? Me too…nyuk, nyuk, nyuk!

  4. timetochooseagain

    Come on Andy, we’ve all seen your picture. We know you’re not 18. Of course, I’d have my picture, but I like my anonymity. đŸ˜‰ Actually, I did see that, but thanks for reminding me, in really is quite interesting! The shear exaggeration going on by Gore and friends is so appalling and obvious even his fellow travelers are starting to pick up on it. Now if only they would listen to reason more often…

  5. Andrew, I’ve got blisters that are older than 18…and three sons older than that…and this one mole…oh, never mind!

    You keep up the good work Andrew.

  6. timetochooseagain

    Will do!